Admittedly, when people think of getting in their cars and driving to a camping vacation spot, the Northwest Territories probable are not figured highly on the list of places to go. That's too bad. The territory has a number of parks that dot the main scenic roads, and make for a great way to see the northern part of Canada. Below are the parks of the Northwest Territories.

Frontier Trail

The Frontier Trail begins near Kakisa on Highway 1 and leads to Yellowknife, on the north shore of Great Slave Lake. There are a number of parks along the route.

Dory Point Territorial Park Day Use Area

Dory Point is a great spot to rest while traveling on the Frontier Trail.

Fred Henne Territorial Park Day Use Area

This park is a great spot for all sorts of water activities - yes the water gets nice and warm. Play in the sand and then take some time to sit and laugh with family and friends over a picnic lunch.

  • Location: On Long Lake
  • Use: Day use.
  • Facilities: Picnic area; Boat launch, fishing, interpretive displays, trails, lookout, playground, swimming.
  • Activities: Play volleyball on the beach. Enjoy a beautiful day at this popular beach.
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Fred Henne Territorial Park

A little bit of natural life so close to the lights of Yellowknife.

  • Location: 3 km from Yellowknife on Long Lake.
  • Use: Camping; day use.
  • Facilities: Campground, electricity, picnic/day use, kitchen shelter, showers, drinking water, dump station, firewood, boat launch, interpretive displays, information centre, trails, swimming.
  • Activities: Hike Prospector's Trail, and the other trails through the forests and around the lakes and into the city of Yellowknife. Camp in one of the 115 sites, most of which are serviced.
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North Arm Territorial Park Day Use Area

A great place to stop, rest and take in the beauty that is this magnificent territory.

  • Location: On Great Slave Lake a short drive away from Yellowknife.
  • Use: Day use.
  • Facilities: Picnic/day use, kitchen shelter, boat launch.
  • Activities: Take a walk around the park - as part of the Canadian Shield, it is a story of the history of time. Waterfowl use the area for nesting.
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Fort Providence Territorial Park

  • Location: Near Fort Providence.
  • Use: Camping; day use.
  • Facilities: Camping, picnic area, kitchen shelter, drinking water, sewage station, firewood, trails.
  • Activities: Look for bison, and other great wildlife viewing opportunities. There are 21 services campsites on the Mackenzie River. Go fishing on the Mackenzie River.
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Ingraham Trail

Travel the road, which is mostly paved, that begins in Yellowknife and ends at Tibbitt Lake. Explore the fascinating natural history. There are two campgrounds on the trail.

Yellowknife River Territorial Park Day Use Area

Come to a park where the water is so blue, you will want to stay.

  • Location: On the Yellowknife River.
  • Use: Day use.
  • Facilities: Washrooms, kitchen shelter, boat launch, fishing, trails, playground.
  • Activities: Stop in to the park for a picnic. Anglers will enjoy fishing on the river. The River is part of a system of lakes, so boaters can explore farther into the parklands. There are campsites nearby.
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Prelude Lake Territorial Park

Prelude is the largest park on the Ingraham Trail. Enjoy the sandy beaches, boating and the fantastic views. Touch the coarse sand on the beautiful rocky beach.

  • Location: A close drive from Yellowknife, and part of the Cameron River waterway system.
  • Use: Camping; day use.
  • Facilities: Washrooms, picnic area, kitchen shelter, drinking water, sewage station, firewood, boat launch, interpretive displays, trails, playground.
  • Activities: Anglers can fish for trout and pike in the waters of the park. See the beautiful views from the lookout. Hikers will enjoy the natural beauty. Boaters can launch their vessels. There are 44 private campsites in the park.
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Hidden Lake Territorial Park

Hidden Lake is a real treat for backcountry campers and wilderness hikers. Portage into the park for a true wilderness experience.

  • Location: On Hidden Lake, about 45 km east of Yellowknife.
  • Use: Camping; day use.
  • Facilities: There are no services at the park.
  • Activities: Fish on the crystal clear water. Hike the trails to the two abandoned gold mines, or to Cameron Falls. Spend the day at Powder Point Day Use Area. Enjoy a view of the rapids.
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Powder Point Day Use Area

Explore this day use area and the ungroomed water's edge, where native plants thrive in an untouched territory.

  • Location: On the eastern arm of Prelude Lake, about 45 km east of Yellowknife.
  • Use: Day use. The park is accessible in the winter by walking over the ice.
  • Facilities: Washrooms, picnic area, fishing, interpretive displays.
  • Activities: Hop in your canoe and travel on the Lower Cameron River Canoe Route and the Powder Point Canoe Route, enjoying the rapids
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Cameron Falls Day Use Area

The natural beauty of the park is a wonder to behold at any time of the year.

  • Location: In Hidden Lake Territorial Park, 47 km east of Yellowknife.
  • Use: Day use. The park is accessible in the winter.
  • Facilities: Pit toilets, picnic area, trails, lookout.
  • Activities: Hike the trail to Cameron Falls, and take your canoe along the Lower Cameron River Canoe Route. Wooden walkways up the hills and a footbridge over the river make traveling easier for everyone.
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Reid Lake Territorial Park

This park boasts large campsites with fire pits - many with a view of the river. There is a lovely sandy beach for water lovers.

  • Location: In Hidden Lake Territorial Park, 47 km east of Yellowknife.
  • Use: Camping; day use.
  • Facilities: Washrooms, picnic area, kitchen shelter, drinking water, firewood, boat launch, interpretive display.
  • Activities: There are 65 un-serviced campsites and 11 tent pads for short-stay visitors. Enjoy nature in all of its splendour by hiking the trails, boating down the Ingraham Trail Canoe Routes or on Reid Lake, or watching birds and wildlife in their natural habitat.
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Waterfalls Route

The Waterfalls Route, on NWT Highway 1, runs from the territorial border to Enterprise, and over to Checkpoint where Highways 1 and 7 meet. Make sure to make several stops to admire the waterfalls and waters in the area. The campgrounds in the area are not serviced- true remote, wilderness settings.

60th Parallel Territorial Park

A beautiful spot overlooking the Hay River, where visitors can stay for the day or more.

  • Location: Near Hay River, at the Northwest Territories - Alberta border.
  • Use: Camping; day use.
  • Facilities: Washrooms, picnic area, drinking water, sewage station, firewood, boat launch, interpretive display, information centre.
  • Activities: There is a small campground with 7 spots, which are not serviced. The park gives visitors insight into the history of the territory and its residents through displays and a staffed information centre.
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Twin Falls Gorge Territorial Park

Magnificent views make this park a must-see.

  • Location: Near Hay River, at the Northwest Territories - Alberta border.
  • Use: Camping; Day use.
  • Facilities: Washrooms, picnic area, drinking water, sewage station, firewood, boat launch, interpretive display, information centre.
  • Activities: The park is actually made up of three areas - Alexandra Falls Day Use Area, Louise Falls Campground & Day Use Area and the Escarpment Creek Group Campsite. Hike Ann Buggins Medicine Walk, or to the waterfalls and Hay River Canyon, explore the area, and enjoy a picnic lunch. Wooden walkways make areas of the park more accessible.
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Alexandra Falls Day Use Area

Get a close up view of Alexandra Falls from a vantage point on the rocks. The park is part of Twin Falls Gorge Territorial Park.

  • Location: Near Hay River, at the Northwest Territories - Alberta border.
  • Use: Day use.
  • Facilities: Washrooms, picnic area, kitchen shelter, interpretive display.
  • Activities: Walk the boardwalk and enjoy the day exploring the falls.
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Louise Falls Campground

The campground is a visual testament to the power of nature, where visitors can see 400 million year old limestone formations.

  • Location: Near Hay River, at the Northwest Territories - Alberta border.
  • Use: Camping.
  • Facilities: Washrooms, picnic area, kitchen shelter, showers, electricity, drinking water, interpretive display, playground.
  • Activities: There are 9 serviced campsites and 12 non-powered sites in the campground area. Walk the spiral staircase to a special spot that overlook Louise Falls. Hike the well-groomed trails.
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Escarpment Creek Group Camping Area

Waterfalls are abundant along the gorge.

  • Location: Near Hay River, at the Northwest Territories - Alberta border.
  • Use: Group camping; day use.
  • Facilities: Washrooms, picnic area, kitchen shelter, drinking water, firewood, playground.
  • Activities: Come with the family for a day of fun. Or, come and camp with your group. Make sure you walk around the park and see the gorge.
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McNallie Creek Territorial Park

A small picnic area with a short trail leading to the 17-metre McNallie Creek Falls. At the viewing platform, a plaque explains the origin of the creek's name. Look for the cliff swallows nesting in the ravine walls.

  • Location: Near McNallie Creek.
  • Use: Day use.
  • Facilities: Washrooms, picnic area.
  • Activities: Come with the family for a day of fun.
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Lady Evelyn Falls Territorial Park

The falls - Lady Evelyn Falls - are worth the trip to this park. The well-groomed trails make it a fun day for everyone.

  • Location: Near the Kakisa River.
  • Use: Camping; day use.
  • Facilities: Electricity, washrooms, picnic area, kitchen shelter, showers, drinking water, firewood, interpretive display, information centre.
  • Activities: Hike the trail to Lady Evelyn Falls, and walk down the staircase to the base of the falls for a breathtaking view of natural at its finest. Anglers can fish for northern pike, pickerel and Arctic grayling. There are 23 campsites, 10 of which have a power supply.
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Kakisa River Territorial Park

Hike the trail to Lady Evelyn Falls.

  • Location: On the Kakisa River.
  • Use: Day use.
  • Facilities: Washrooms, picnic area, firewood, boat launch.
  • Activities: Enjoy a picnic with a view of the Kakisa River. Fish for grayling in the Kakisa.
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Sambaa Deh Falls Territorial Park

"Sambaa Deh" means "Trout River" in the language of the Slavey First Nations People. Listen to the sounds of the rushing rapids.

  • Location: On the Trout River at Highway 1.
  • Use: Camping; Day use.
  • Facilities: Washrooms, picnic area, showers, drinking water, sewage station, firewood, information centre, playground.
  • Activities: Nature can be wild and wonderful, and the Trout River, Sambaa Deh Falls and Coral Falls all remind visitors that water is powerful and has no master. So, when you go see the views, be careful. Anglers can fish for Arctic grayling and pickerel. When hiking, take notice of the many fossils. Campers can set up at one of the 20 non-serviced campsites.
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Heritage Route

Travel the Heritage Route northwest from Checkpoint to Fort Simpson, with the route ending at Wrigley. Mountains, lakes and rivers abound on this route. Fort Simpson Territorial Park welcomes campers.

Fort Simpson Territorial Park

Reptiles, plants and birds abound at Fort Simpson Territorial Park. Visit the Snye wetland ecosystem.

  • Location: Near the entrance to Fort Simpson, where the Mackenzie River and the Liard River meet.
  • Use: Camping; Day use.
  • Facilities: Washrooms, electricity, picnic area, kitchen shelter, showers, firewood, drinking water, sewage station, playground.
  • Activities: Birders will enjoy the park, and, if you've never heard northern frogs sing, it's worthwhile to take in that. There is a community trail for hikers to visit different historic sites. Fish, canoe and raft for a watery adventure. There are 32 campsites in the park, 20 of which are powered.
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Great Slave Route

The Great Slave Route begins at Enterprise, on Highway 2, and along the southern shores of Great Slave Lake. The route passes through Hay River and Fort Resolution. Travelers can camp at Hay River Territorial Park and Little Buffalo River Crossing Park.

Hay River Territorial Park

Enjoy a true beach holiday at Hay River Territorial Park.

  • Location: On Vale Island in Hay River.
  • Use: Camping; Day use.
  • Facilities: Electricity, washrooms, picnic area, kitchen shelter, showers, drinking water, sewage station, firewood, information centre, playground.
  • Activities: Swim on the sandy beaches of Great Slave Lake. Anglers can fish for northern pike. For those who want to sit and watch what's going on, sit and watch the barges and fishing boats on the lake. Campers can set up in one of 35 campsites at the well-maintained campgrounds.
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Little Buffalo River Crossing Territorial Park

Picturesque and serene, visitors enjoy everything about the park, including its proximity to Fort Resolution.

  • Location: On the shore of Little Buffalo River, close the Great Slave Lake.
  • Use: Camping; Day use.
  • Facilities: Washrooms, picnic area, firewood, boat launch.
  • Activities: Anglers can fish in Little Buffalo River, and boaters can enjoy a pleasant afternoon on the water. Campers can set up in one of 12 campsites.
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Wood Buffalo Route

The Wood Buffalo route travels to Fort Smith. Travelers should stop and see the salt plains and the bison herds in Wood Buffalo National Park. This area of the territories is home to two territorial parks, Little Buffalo River Falls and Queen Elizabeth Territorial Park.

Wood Buffalo National Park

The park is actually a national park, run by the government of Canada. However, it should be noted as a place to visit when on the Wood Buffalo Route. It is the largest national park in North America, and is a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

  • Location: Located at the Northwest Territories - Alberta border.
  • Use: Day use.
  • Facilities: There are no facilities in the park.
  • Activities: Visitors to the park should keep an eye out for wildlife such as moose, Wood Bison, black and brown bears, lynx, beaver and snowshoe hares. Birders can see Whooping Cranes and Sandhill Cranes. The flat, sparsely treed environment makes hiking easy.
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Little Buffalo River Falls Territorial Park

Look down into the gorge at the falls and the Little Buffalo River.

  • Location: Located at the Northwest Territories - Alberta border.
  • Use: Day use.
  • Facilities: Washrooms, picnic areas, interpretive displays, playground.
  • Activities: The flat, sparsely treed environment, the result of a fire in the 1980's, makes hiking easy. There are six campsites, none with electricity.
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Madeline Lake Territorial Park Day Use Area

The park is a nice comfortable spot to relax.

  • Location: Located on Madeline Lake.
  • Use: Day use.
  • Facilities: Washrooms, picnic areas, boat launch, playground.
  • Activities: Enjoy a day of picnicking, boating and water activities.
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Queen Elizabeth Territorial Park

Queen Elizabeth Territorial Park is a great place to see White Pelicans in the summer, and catch a glimpse of the red-sided garter snake.

  • Location: Outside of Fort Smith, close to the Slave River.
  • Use: Camping; day use.
  • Facilities: Washrooms, picnic area, kitchen shelter, showers, drinking water, sewage station, firewood, interpretive display, information centre, playground.
  • Activities: Besides the great bird watching and wildlife viewing, visitors can go white water kayaking and rafting. There are 17 powered campsites; because the park is not heavily-treed, generally, the camp sites are not very private.
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Fort Smith Mission Territorial Park Day Use Area

Also known as Fort Smith Mission Heritage Park, the area is actually the remnants of the Oblate Catholic Mission, when Fort Smith was the capital of the Northwest Territories.

  • Location: Outside of Fort Smith, close to the Slave River.
  • Use: Day use.
  • Facilities: Washrooms, picnic area, interpretive displays, information centre.
  • Activities: Eat a picnic lunch and then set out to explore the various sites along the trials, which tell the history of the Oblate Mission and its presence for more than a century in the community.
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Dempster Highway

Start your travels on the Dempster Highway 40 km east of Dawson City, Yukon. Travel the whole route to Inuvik for a true taste of backcountry. In the winter, if conditions are right, there are ice roads that connect Inuvik to Aklavik and Tuktoyaktuk.

Happy Valley Territorial Park

At Happy Valley Territorial Park, experience the wilds of NWT and hang out in Inuvik.

  • Location: Located in Inuvik.
  • Use: Camping; day use.
  • Facilities: Electricity, washrooms, picnic area.
  • Activities: There are 19 serviced campsites and 8 without power for campers - all in open areas and close to each other. Enjoy the views of the Mackenzie River and the Richardson Mountains.
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Nitainlaii Territorial Park

This area of the Northwest Territories is rich with the history and culture of the Gwich'in Dene people.

  • Location: Located by the Peel River.
  • Use: Camping; day use.
  • Facilities: Washrooms, picnic areas, kitchen shelter, drinking water, interpretive displays, information centre.
  • Activities: There are 23 campsites, all without power. Relax on the cliffs among the birch and spruce trees, and take in the beauty of the Peel River.
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Gwich'in Territorial Park

Beautiful tall coniferous trees grace the park, and welcome visitors.

  • Location: In the Mackenzie Delta
  • Use: Camping; day use.
  • Facilities: Washrooms, picnic areas.
  • Activities: There are five sites in the park, two of which are campgrounds. There is a lookout for hikers and those with an eye for a great view for limestone cliffs and Campbell Lake, which is a reversing delta.
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Norman Wells

The Norman Wells Route is served by ice road in the winter. If you plan on getting to any of the areas on the route during summer, such as Tulita, Norman Wells, Colville Lake and Deline, then you have to fly. There are two territorial parks in the area, both with campgrounds.

McKinnon Territorial Park

Get a gorgeous view of the Mackenzie Mountains and the Mackenzie River.

  • Location: In the community of Norman Wells, on the banks of the Mackenzie River.
  • Use: Camping; day use.
  • Facilities: Washrooms, picnic area, firewood, playground.
  • Activities: Camp at one of 8 campsites, none with electricity. Hike the rugged and challenging Canol Trail, and see the Mackenzie Mountains up close.
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Ja'k Territorial Park

The park is one more example of the rugged, yet simple, beauty of Northern Canada.

  • Location: Located outside Inuvik.
  • Use: Camping; day use.
  • Facilities: Electricity, washrooms, picnic areas, kitchen shelters, showers, drinking water, interpretive displays, information centre, playground.
  • Activities: Camp at one of 6 electricity-supplied campsites, or one of the 32 without electricity. Hike to the observation tower to get a panoramic view of the park. Bird watch, or walk the trails to see the many berries that grow in the park.
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Liard Trail

The Liard Trail follows the Liard River valley to Fort Liard at the Northwest Territories - British Columbia border, beginning at Checkpoint and traveling southwest. Camp at Blackstone Territorial Park.

Blackstone Territorial Park

Enjoy the beautiful blue waters in the park.

  • Location: On the Liard River, downstream from where the South Nahanni River and Liard River meet.
  • Use: Camping; day use.
  • Facilities: There are no services in the park.
  • Activities: Enjoy the views of the Nahanni Mountains. Go canoeing, fishing or boating on the South Nahanni, Blackstone or Liard Rivers. Hike through the park and observe the wildlife. There are 19 campsites in the park, none with any electrical or sewage services.
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