The Yukon Territory has, under government jurisdiction, 9 territorial parks and 7 protected areas. (Because Yukon is actually a territory and not a province, the parks are known as "territorial" parks, and not "provincial" ones.) The territory is a mecca of sparse tundra, hardy plant and animal life, and a pristine beauty that is unmatched anywhere. Below is a list of the Yukon's parks and protected areas.

Yukon Territorial Parks

All of the parks in the Yukon have been identifies and negotiated under agreements between the Government of the Yukon and area First Nations peoples. The agreements ensure that the land stays protected from development, and allows First Nations to continue their traditional living on the land, whilst also letting visitors experience and appreciate the beauty and the history of the land.

Agay Mene Territorial Park

Agay Mene is total wilderness. This park was identified, in the Carcross Tagish First Nation Final Agreement, as an area to be protected so that the wildlife can be protected for the continued use of the Carcross/Tagish and Teslin Tlingit people. A management plan for the park is still being developed, so, this park is technically not a designated park yet.

  • Location: About 100 km southeast of Whitehorse. The southern portion of the park runs along the Yukon - British Columbia border.
  • Use: Day use.
  • Season/Hours: Contact Environment Yukon for details.
  • Amenities: There are no services in the park.
  • Things to do: In different area of the park, there is different wildlife - moose in the south and west regions of the park, and caribou in the north and east (in summer months). Go sports fishing in Tarfu and Snafu Lakes. There are campsites, and opportunities to hike on Mount White, boat and catch a glimpse of black bears, grizzly bears, beaver, mink and other various animals.
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Asi Keyi Territorial Park

Asi Keyi is the traditional land of the Kluane and White River First Nations. Like Agay Mene, the park is not yet designated. The park is 3,024 sq.km of wilderness.

  • Location: In the southwest region of the Yukon, with the western region of the park running along the Yukon - Alaska border.
  • Use: Day use.
  • Season/Hours: Contact Environment Yukon for details.
  • Amenities: There are no services in the park.
  • Things to do: Hike through the beautiful untouched wilderness and see forest, glaciers, huge mountains, and landscaped that have been designed by volcanic ash. There is camping near the park, at Lake Creek campground off of the Alaska Highway.
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Coal River Springs Territorial Park

Coal River is the traditional land of the Liard First Nations. It is an area that is graced with limestone terraces created by cool, flowing water. The isolated region is a great place to spend the day or a few days, exploring its beauty.

  • Location: On the east side of the Coal River, in southeast Yukon.
  • Use: Camping; day use.
  • Season/Hours: Contact Environment Yukon for details.
  • Amenities: Picnic area.
  • Things to do: The Coal River and its tributary streams and lakes make it the perfect spot for whitewater canoeing and rafting. There is a recreation area and an area for campers about 200 metres east of the limestone formations.
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Herschel Island-Qikiqtaruk Territorial Park

This park was established through agreement of the Inuvialuit, the Yukon Government, the Aklavik Hunters and Trappers Committee, the Inuvialuit Game Council. Get to this isolated park by boat or by air, and enjoy a wilderness adventure.

  • Location: Herschel Island is in the Beaufort Sea, off the northern coast of Yukon about five km.
  • Use: Camping; day use.
  • Season/Hours: Contact Environment Yukon for details.
  • From mid-June to mid-September, Herschel Island-Qikiqtaruk Territorial Park is accessible by boat and aircraft on a charter basis. You can charter aircraft out of Inuvik, Northwest Territories (250 km southeast). Boat charters may be operating out of various Mackenzie Delta communities."
  • Amenities: Some potable water; pit toilets; transport services (air and sea).
  • Things to do: Wander and see the diverse plant and animal life of the arctic region. The park is home to the Inuvialuit, so the area is alive with thousands of years of human history. Campers can stay overnight in designated areas.
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Kusawa Territorial Park

The park is the traditional land of the Carcross/Tagish, Champagne and Aishihik, and Kwanlin Dun First Nations. It is not yet a designated territorial park. The 3,210 km2 park has diverse eco-regions throughout.

Ni'iinlii Njik (Fishing Branch) Territorial Park and Habitat Protection Area

"Ni'iinlii Njik -"where fish spawn" or "fishing branch" - has both a park and a Habitat Protection Area. The 65010 sq. km park sits on the traditional lands of the Gwich'in First Nations. Come for the limestone caves and the remarkable landscapes and wildlife such as Grizzly Bears and Porcupine Caribou.

  • Location: Halfway between Dawson City and Old Crow; in Vuntut Gwitchin Traditional Territory. Access by helicopter.
  • Use: Camping (restricted); day use.
  • Season/Hours: Contact Environment Yukon for details.
  • Amenities: There are no services in the park.
  • Things to do: The area is an ecological reserve, and the grizzly bears are protected. Camping is allowed, as is access to a hut designated for bear-watching activities, but access is restricted and tightly managed. Those with wilderness skills can access the Wilderness Preserve portion and the Habitat Protection Area, remembering that there are no services in the park.
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Tombstone Territorial Park

Tombstone Territorial Park is on the traditional lands of the Tr'ondek Hwech'in, Na Cho Nyak Dun, Gwich'in First Nations, and the Inuvialuit peoples. The beauty of the park lies in its natural and human history.

  • Location: 1.5 hour drive from Dawson City, Yukon, 7 hours from Whitehorse and 12 hours from Inuvik, NWT. The Dempster Highway runs through the park.
  • Use: Camping (restricted); day use.
  • Season/Hours: Contact Environment Yukon for details.
  • Amenities: Services in the park are limited to Tombstone Mountain Campground: pit toilets, bear-proof storage, fire pits, some potable water. There are no services in other areas of the park. An interpretive centre is located on Dempster Highway.
  • Things to do: Camping is a restricted activity in the park. There are two campgrounds, Tombstone Mountain Campground, and three backcountry campgrounds. There are very few established trials in the park, so hikers must be self-sufficient and prepared for the rugged terrain of granite pinnacles and harsh arctic tundra. Wildlife lovers will get to see moose, caribou, dall sheep, bears, and falcons.
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Habitat Protection Areas

A Habitat Protection Area (HPA) is an area identified as requiring special protection under Yukon's Wildlife Act. The mandate for an HPS is the preserve area habitat and the First Nations traditional living. HPAs protect approximately 577,000 hectares of Yukon habitat.

Big Island Habitat Protection Area

Big Island HPA is 7.6 sq. km and is heavily populated by moose, which use it for calving, and many bird species. The area is the traditional land of the Northern Tutchone people.

  • Location: 5 km upstream of Mayo, in the Stewart River.
  • Use: Day use (restricted activity).
  • Season/Hours: Contact Environment Yukon for details.
  • Amenities: There are no services in the park.
  • Things to do: There is currently licensed hunting of moose allowed in the park, but because of the vulnerability of the wildlife and habitat in the area, particularly from human contact, all interested in going to the HPA should get more information.
  • Devil's Elbow Habitat Protection Area

    Named by the riverboat captains and pilots who had to "jack-knife" their boats and barges to make their way around the bend, Devil's Elbow, also known as "17 Mile" is where Northern Tutchone people practice their traditional way of life.

    • Location: Between Stewart Crossing and Mayo, along the Stewart River.
    • Use: Day use (restricted activity).
    • Season/Hours: Contact Environment Yukon for details.
    • Amenities: There are no services in the park.
    • Things to do: There is currently licensed hunting of moose allowed in the park, but because of the vulnerability of the wildlife and habitat in the area, particularly from human contact, get more information before planning your trip.
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    Horseshoe Slough Habitat Protection Area

    This 79 sq. km. slough is a side channel of the Stewart River at the mouth of No Gold Creek. The area is on the traditional lands of the Nacho Nyak Dun First Nation, and is vital for healthy waterfowl breeding and staging.

    • Location: 80 km upstream of Mayo.
    • Use: Day use (restricted activity).
    • Season/Hours: Contact Environment Yukon for details.
    • Amenities: There are no services in the park.
    • Things to do: Moose hunting is allowed, but it is strictly managed. Discuss your plans with Environment Yulon beforehand to ensure you understand the rules, and have a trip of a lifetime.

    Lhútsäw Wetland Habitat Protection Area

    This 31 sq. km wetland complex is on the traditional lands of the Selkirk First Nation. The two largest lakes in the area are Lhútsäw Män (Jackfish Lake) and Tthe Ndu Män (Rock Island Lake).

    • Location: On the North Klondike Highway south of Pelly Crossing"
    • Use: Day use (restricted activity).
    • Season/Hours: Contact Environment Yukon for details.
    • Amenities: There are no services in the park.
    • Things to do: There is the opportunity to hunt, fish and trap. All of these activities are strictly managed by authorities, and all visitors should inquire about access.

    * * * * * Ni'iinlii Njik (Fishing Branch) Territorial Park and Habitat Protection Area - see above * * * * *

    Old Crow Flats Habitat Protection Area

    Old Crow Flats is 12,100 sq. km and, with over 2,000 ponds and marshes, it is a vital breeding and moulting ground for more than 500,000 water birds each year. The area is on the traditional lands of the Gwitchin First Nation.

    • Location: On the Old Crow River system north of the Arctic Circle.
    • Use: Day use (restricted activity).
    • Season/Hours: Contact Environment Yukon for details.
    • Amenities: There are no services in the park.
    • Things to do: With its importance as a bird breeding ground, Old Crow Flats is a great place to view the wildlife in the area. Visitors can also go fishing, hunting, and trapping, but under restricted conditions.

    Ta'Tla Mun Habitat Protection Area

    Ta'Tla Mun, is a conservation area with the mandatre of protecting the eight freshwater fish species thatlive in the waters of Ta'Tla Mun Lake. The area is on the traditional lands of the Selkirk First Nation.

    • Location: 40 kilometres southeast of Pelly Crossing; accessible by air, ATV and snow machine.
    • Use: Day use (restricted activity).
    • Season/Hours: Contact Environment Yukon for details.
    • Amenities: There are no services in the park.
    • Things to do: Go fishing for lake trout, whitefish and northern pike. Visitors can also go hunting and trapping. As this is an HPA, visitor activities are strictly managed.

    Tsâwnjik Chu (Nordenskiold) Wetland Habitat Protection Area

    The wetlands of Tsâwnjik Chu are a vital waterfowl staging area. The wetlands sit on the traditional lands of the Little Salmon/Carmacks First Nation. Come to Tsâwnjik Chu to see the different species of birds, and be a witness to the daily life of the other wildlife in the area.

    • Location: South of the village of Cormacks.
    • Use: Day use (restricted activity).
    • Season/Hours: Contact Environment Yukon for details.
    • Amenities: There are no services in the park.
    • Things to do: Watch the wildlife - moose, ducks and other birds, and muskrat - on the tundra and at Nordenskiold River.





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